And she, also through emotion, made me perceive

Abū Ḥāmid Muḥammad ibn Muḥammad al-Ghazālī, 11th-12th century Persian mystic Islamic philosopher and theologian on the emotional communicatory power of sound.

Many a cooing pigeon in the early dawn, full of disquietude, has cried among the swaying branches;

She remembered a mate and a time of happiness, and she wept for sorrow and she aroused my sorrow.

So my weeping often disquieted her and her weeping often disquieted me.

And, in truth, I would sometimes soothe her yet not make her understand, and she would sometimes complain yet not make me understand;

But I, through emotion, made her perceive, and she also, through emotion, made me perceive.

From his chapter on Music and singing in Ihya ‘Ulum ad-Din (“The Revival of the Religious Sciences”). Translation to English by Duncan B. Macdonald

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on the honest labors of mimesis

“Now the strange thing about this silly if not desperate place between the read and the really made-up is that it appears to be where most of us spend our time as epistemically correct, socially created, and occasionally creative beings. We dissimulate. We act and have to act as if mischief were not afoot in the kingdom of the real and that all around the ground lay firm. That is what the public secret, the facticity of the social fact, being a social being, is all about. No matter how sophisticated we may be as to the constructed and arbitrary character of our practices, including our practices of representation, our practices of practices is one of actively forgetting such mischief each time we open our mouths to ask for something or to make a statement. Try to imagine what would happen if we didn’t in daily practice thus conspire to actively forget what Saussure called “the arbitrariness of the sign?” Our try the opposite experiment. Try to imagine living in a world whose signs were indeed “natural.”

Something nauseating looms here, and we are advised to beat a retreat to the unmentionable world of active forgetting where, pressed into mighty service by society, the mimetic faculty carries out its honest labor suturing nature to artifice and bringing sensuousness to sense by means of what was once called sympathetic magic, granting the copy the character and power of the original, the representation the power of the represented.”

—Michael Taussig, 1993, Mimesis and Alterity, a particular history of the senses (xvii-xviii)

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ki-ni-kə-ˈnik zine vol. V now available

You can download a copy by clicking here: *KINNIKINNICK V Electronic Zine

This volume, on the topic “eggs: their meaning and purpose,” features translations, a tale of musical forensics, songs and lyrics, mathematic drawing instructions, and works of visual art by Ben Greenberg, Alex Kruckman, Dina Maccabee, Alexander Marcus, and Rachel Colwell with highlights of previously published drawings, prose, paintings, advertisements, and musical scores by Hieronymus Bosch, Gielis Panhedelis, Thomas Crecquillon, Mohammad Ibn Mohammad al-Nafzewi, Sir Richard Burton, and The Western Druggist Magazine.

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These contributors explored a wide range of topics, including the shape and physical form of the egg, the anatomy of the chicken egg, the egg as depicted in art works and music, the egg in religious and folkloric origin myths, and the use of egg as an aphrodisiac. As always, it was a delight to work with these wonderful submissions and brilliant contributors.

I have printing several copies of Kinnikinnick vol. V in Berkeley so if you’re around and want a paper copy  just ask or drop me a comment here. If you are interested in printing and distributing copies in your own (physical) area, please let me know and I will send you a link so that you can download the print-able version. Unless they’ve been (un)lawfully seized, you can find copies of all of the Kinnikinnick zines in the University of California Berkeley Doe Library at the call number: PS3505 Co118 R118 MAIN

Please, these aren’t and will never be for sale. If reproduced, all authors must be cited.

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topo cards

Here are some new cards I’m pretty proud of. They’re made from old topo(graphy) maps, which I got for free at an estate sale recently and are backed with some stiff-ish oaktag. With the amount of “upcycling” I do these days, I’m a borderline hipster.

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The Hamptons Erasures

A series of erasure poems composed poolside this summer in the Hamptons.

1. but somehow nobody is able to keep them here to say the Rosary
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2. You heard how I intend to open every specimen
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3. the let’s-go-to-Mass-together-on-Sunday voice
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4. it turned out that he was absolutely right
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5. his real name was stranger
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6. I must admit I can understand her position
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7. On the way he thought suddenly of his son
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FIGMENT: The Art of Subtraction

I’m flattered that FIGMENT—a free, inclusive, participatory arts event that is held in multiple cities and which drawing tens of thousands of participants each year—has published an article about my project contribution in Oakland in Fall 2015. Here’s a few other favorite photos from “The Art of Subtraction.” I had a great interview with Adelia Gregory, wrote the piece.

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ki-ni-kə-ˈnik zine vol. IV now available

It can be safely viewed here. The formatting is preserved best by a download of the pdf rather than online viewing.

There has been a long delay since the release of the physical paper format of this volume (in October, 2015) and its electronic release today in May, 2017. I’ve been abroad and away from my trusty scanner, but now I’m back at it. This volume on the topic “figuratively speaking” features the poetic, fiction, and non-fiction works of Johanna Bronk, Aurora Feeney-Kleinfeldt, Susan Letcher, Alexander Marcus, Cody Ross Rex, Alyssa Stearns, and Rachel Colwell with highlights of pre-published drawings, prose, and paintings by Edward Gorey, Norton Juster & David Small, and Pieter Breghel. These contributors explored a wide range of topics, including metaphors, proverbs, word play, mad libbing, and other intriguing aspects of language and the linguistic arts. As always, it was a delight to work with these wonderful submissions and brilliant contributors.

Kinnikinnick Cover 4 Cropped

I have printing several copies of Kinnikinnick vol. IV in Berkeley so if you’re around and want a paper copy  just ask or drop me a comment here. If you are interested in printing and distributing copies in your own (physical) area, please let me know and I will send you a link so that you can download the print-able version. Unless they’ve been (un)lawfully seized, you can find copies of all of the Kinnikinnick zines in the University of California Berkeley Doe Library at the call number: PS3505 Co118 R118 MAIN

Please, these aren’t and will never be for sale. If reproduced, all authors must be cited.

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